Philips 765 CDR Recorder - Creating Music CDs
(archive of info organized by Mark Gallagher 1998 - 2000)
(this is not an official site of Philips Electronics)

Philips 765 CD Recorder

(same as Philips CDR765BK, Philips Magnavox CDR200BK and similar to Philips 760)


2007 Update > > >  More ideas regarding Error messages: Two reports that newer Sony CDRs work in the 765. More reports that other brands of 40x plus speed CDR do not work in the 765 (try the Sony).

Also report that cleaning the laser using a CD / DVD laser lens cleaner may fix the problem with random error messages.

This laser lens cleaner is a CD you put in the 765 and brushes on the CD clean the laser.

Memorex Laser Lens Cleaner on Amazon ($5) - note these laser cleaner CDs also available at Best Buy and Radio Shack

2006 Update > > > the No OPC Error message when using new 40x (or higher) speed audio CDRs.
One possible fix
, turn on the 765, leave the left tray empty and closed.  Open the right tray and put in a recorded CD (not a CDR but a regular CD from your music collection), close the right tray.  Wait a couple of seconds as the 765 reads the right side CD.  Now open the left tray and insert your CDR. The 765 should read the CDR without the error message.  Now you can take out the CD in the right tray and record to the CDR from any source.  Let me know if this works for you.

Important 2005 Update >>> Several people report the newest blank CDRs rated at 40x speed may not work in the 765. The "OPC error" is seen even when using the "audio" or "music" version of the CDR. This problem is confirmed by one user of the Memorex 40x Music CDR - the left side tray of this CDR was not recognized by the 765 (see new fix above).

Important Note, the feedback that higher speed blank CDRs (over 40x) do not work with the 765 is only one possible cause.  The real problem may be that the 765 has been damaged during transport (most likely the laser becomes out of alignment) or the laser needs to be cleaned (see note above about cheap laser lens CD cleaners). The 765 is subject to laser problems after transport with improper packaging.  If your 765 does not work with the blank CDRs (and the fix suggested above does not work), call a local electronics service store and ask if they are experienced repairing lasers in philips CD players / recorders. 

Most common question >>> When I insert a blank CDR into the left side tray, I get a "No Audio" or "OPC error". What am I doing wrong ? Answer: you are probably using a data CDR made for computers. These do not work in the stereo based CD recorders like the 765.  You need a "Music" or "Digital Audio" blank CDR.  Read this FAQ.

Feedback / Questions : mark@gallagher.com

 

Introduction

Key Features

My Setup

Related Links (best CDR and 765 vendors) <<<

Sample Music CD

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's)

Complete Manual in pdf format (english) < Manual
Philips Documentation (other languages)
(you need Acrobat Reader to view these pdf  files)

About this site

Return to Mark's Home Page

Introduction:

This site is no longer updated on a regular basis, but is provided as an archive of information for owners of the 765.

The 765 is an older model (1998 - 2000), music CD recorder (with two CD decks) that was designed to be hooked-up to a stereo system and not a computer. 

Custom CD CoverThe Philips 765 is a versatile CD recording device that lets you make music CDs that include the favorite tracks of your music CD collection, or make a CD that is an archive of your best music on analog sources such as albums, cassette or music recorded on video tape. The 765 can also be used to record and make copies of your original music.

I created this site to share information about my experience using the 765 and communicate with others involved in CD recording. There is no commercial goal for this site.

Key Features (from the Philips web site)

  • Dual deck Audio CD-Recorder

  • Double speed recording (disc)

  • 2-disc simultaneous playback/2-disc random playback

  • Separate output for CDR and CD

  • Records and plays digital Audio CD-R and CD-RW discs

  • Plays all Audio CDs (120mm + 80 mm discs)

  • Records from all home stereo analogue and digital sources (44.1 kHz)

  • Optical input

  • Digital coaxial input & output

  • Automatic or manual track numbering

  • CD-synchronized auto start recording from all digital sources (disc/track)

  • 1 bit Analogue-to-Digital converter

  • SCMS Serial Copy Management System

  • Max. 30-track program on both CDR and CD deck

  • Remote control

My Setup

I have the setup shown below with a Thorens turntable and Philips CD player and AM/FM Receiver. I also have a stereo VCR connected to the receiver. The VCR is  connected to my TV cable service. The analog output of the receiver is connected to the audio input of the 765 CD recorder. So I can record songs on old albums played on my turntable, VCR from pre-recorded video or live from TV, or from the radio reception of the receiver. I can also insert any music CD I have and record single or multiple tracks to the recorder in true digital format. Note: a VCR is an excellent recording device and the sound quality of songs recorded on the VCR (in SP speed mode) is excellent when transferred to CD via the CDR recorder.

Mark's Stereo Setup

Not pictured are Kef C-Series speakers and a Panasonic stereo VCR connected to the Philips receiver.

Related Links

Low Cost Vendors to Buy CD-R and CD-RW Media:
Note: You need "audio" or "consumer audio" or "music" recordable CDs.

very low cost CDR and CDR-RW vendors:
american-digital.com (excellent vendor)
Cassette House (excellent vendor)
amazon.com (look in Electronics / Computers / Drives and Storage / Blank Media)
Fry's Electronics

cd accessories
Cassette House CDR Supplies
CDR Recordable Factory (all kinds of CDR supplies)
Label Gear
 

Keysan Office Supplies (search for "cd mailers" or "cd labels")
J&R  Music (search for "cd labels")
cdroutlet.com (pens, labels, envelopes, and jewel cases)
CDR Label Maker (windows app)

usenet discussion forums
alt.philips.cdr.discussion

alt.comp.periphs.cdr

excellent audio recording sites
Audio Recording Terms Glossary

Great FAQ's on CD-R Technology
Kodak FAQ on audio CD-Rs and CD-RWs

Sample Music CD

I created this CD from my original CD collection. I play this on my portable CD player on the way to work on a commuter train into Chicago each work day.

  • Jewel, Hands

  • Blessid Union of Souls, Light In Your Eyes

  • Goo Goo Dolls, Iris

  • Sarah McLachlan, Angel

  • Trisha Yearwood, Heart Like A Sad Song

  • Lisa Loeb, Waiting for Wednesday

  • The Wallflowers, Three Marlenas

  • Green Day, Time of Your Life

  • Heart, Stranded

  • Matchbox 20, Real World

  • My So Called Life (Theme)

  • Indigo Girls, I Don't Wanna Talk About It

  • Mary-Chapin Carpenter, Rhythm of the Blues

  • Laurie Sargent, Without Letting Go (Party of Five CD)

  • Vonda Shepard, 100 Tears Away

  • Shawn Colvin, Climb On (Party of Five CD)

  • The Cranberries, Ode To My Family

  • The Lemonheads, Being Around

  • Lisa Loeb, Stay

  • Nanci Griffith, You Were On My Mind

Frequently Asked Questions

Can't find the right Q & A ? .....  check the Usenet Discussion Forums - Philips 765   < < <

introduction and basic info
1a.  Should  I buy a used Philips 765, newer model 775 or a brand new 820?

1b.  What are the potential uses and advantages of the Philips 765 compared to PC-based recording?
1c.  Will the 765 do the "swap trick" so I can use the cheap CD-Rs sold for PCs?

cdr and cd-rw media
2a. What do blank CDs cost? What specifically do I need, a CD-R or CD-RW?
2b. Can I make a custom cover to the plastic CD case and add a list of tracks on the back?
2c. Can I write with a pen on the top of a CDR or stick a label on the top?

basic recording
3a. What are the basic steps to recording with the 765?
3b. Can I transfer songs I recorded on a VCR to a CD?
3c. Can I transfer songs from old albums and cassettes to CD?
3c. How many of my favorite songs can I transfer to one blank CD?
3e. Do you need to finalize a CD-R after each recording session?
3f
. Does the 765 record everything at 2 times (2x) speed?
3g.  Will the 765 make copies of data CDs?
3h. Can you adjust the recording levels so analog sources are the same volume as my digital CD tracks?
3j. Can I manually add track number increments to my analog source music during the recording?

3k. When I record an entire CD at 2x speed,  the 765 is adding a two second pause between each track that is not on my original source CD. This is a problem making copies of live recordings where I do not want these silent gaps between tracks. Can I make copies without these gaps?

advanced recording
4a.  After I create my CD with my favorite songs, can I make copies of this CD? Are there workarounds to the SCMS protection?
4b.  I'm a musician, can I use the 765 to put my own music on CD and make multiple copies?
4c. Can I record my music by connecting my stereo to the 765 but then edit the music on a Computer with a ReWritable CD drive?
4d. I  need more control of my recordings....change volume levels.....delete  portions of tracks...change track orders, etc. Can I use a Mini Disk recorder with the 765 to accomplish this?
4e. Can I record MP3 songs to an audio CD using my computer and the 765?

miscellaneous problems
5a.  How do I contact Philips to get a Manual or Remote Control?

1a. Should I buy a used 765 or newer model  775 or a brand new 820?

The 765 was sold from 1998 to 2000 and was the first dual deck Philips CD recorder that made it pretty easy to create compilation CDs of your favorite music CD collection and record music from analog sources (albums, tapes) to CD.  

Philips released a new dual-deck recorder in June of  2000 called the model 775. According to the Philips news release this model offers better bit for bit recording, friendlier recording prompts, and more control of recording volume levels.

In 2002, Philips released the new 820 model that will read mp3 files, and holds three CDs (two source CDs and one CD recording deck).  

The 765 has a shaky reliability record. It became a hot seller in 1999 and Philips may have rushed the production and quality control may have declined.  So if you buy one on Ebay, make sure the seller has good feedback and confirm with the seller the 765 for sale has been checked out and is in good working order. Many people who purchased a 765 a few years ago, later did all their CD music recording on PC-based CD burners and stopped using their 765 and put them up for sale on Ebay.

My 765 has worked fine and been a good addition to my stereo system for over four years. If you can afford it, I would buy the latest 820 model.  But if you can pick up a cheap 765 on Ebay from a reputable seller, you may get a good deal.  Note, the 765 (and newer models) are not designed for the heavy-duty recording a professional audio expert might require.  They are designed to be CD players for your stereo and allow casual recording of your CDs and albums and tapes.

1b. What are the potential uses and advantages of the Philips 765 compared to PC-based recording?

The advantage of the Philips dual-deck recorders compared to other single-deck recorders or computer-based CD recording is ease of use and versatility in recording from multiple analog sources from your current stereo setup. With the dual CD decks of the 765, it is simply fast and easy to copy tracks from your CD collection to the recordable CD. Also, if you have a stereo setup like mine with multiple analog sources (turntable, VCR, FM radio) connected to your receiver, once your receiver is connected to the 765 you can easily add tracks to the recordable CD from multiple sources (and adjust the loudness of the recording to maintain a consistent volume in the finished CD).

The 765 is versatile enough to do the following:

  • Create a CD with your best tracks from your music CD collection and each track is an exact digital duplicate of the original.

  • Archive your best music recorded on analog sources (albums, cassette, video tape recordings of live concerts, radio, etc.) to CD.

  • Transfer your own original music recordings to CD and make copies of this CD (analog only) for sale or distribution.

  • Use the Philips 765 as a stereo mastering machine in your home studio (more economical than DAT, more durable medium, and anyone can play the result)
    - e.g. for mixdown from 4 or 8 track

1c. Will the 765 do the "swap trick" so I can use the cheap CD-Rs sold for PCs?

No. You need to purchase the "consumer audio" or "audio" blank CDRs for the 765 recorder. The 765 is not "trickable" like some of the earlier Philips recorders.

Note, a couple of Philips models released before the 765 allowed the user to put in a "audio" CDR, initialize the CD, and then pry open the CD tray and replace (swap) the the audio CD for a cheaper data CD and do the recording.  This swap trick was reported on several internet sites.  But the 765 was designed by Philips to prevent the swap trick and there is no work-around.

2a. What do blank CDs cost? What specifically do I need, a CD-R or CD-RW?

2007 Update > > >  More ideas regarding Error messages: Two reports that newer Sony audio CDRs work in the 765. More reports that other brands of 40x plus speed CDR do not work in the 765 (try the Sony).

Also report that cleaning the laser using a CD / DVD laser lens cleaner may fix the problem with random error messages.

This laser lens cleaner is a CD you put in the left and right side trays of the 765 (one at a time) and brushes on the CD clean the laser inside the tray.

Memorex Laser Lens Cleaner on Amazon ($5) - note these laser cleaner CDs also available at Best Buy and Radio Shack

2006 Update > > > The NoOPC error message when using new 40x (or higher) speed audio CDRs.
One possible fix
, turn on the 765, leave the left tray empty and closed.  Open the right tray and put in a recorded CD (not a CDR but a regular CD from your music collection), close the right tray.  Wait a couple of seconds as the 765 reads the right side CD.  Now open the left tray and insert your CDR. The 765 should read the CDR without the error message.  Now you can take out the CD in the right tray and record to the CDR from any source.  Let me know if this works for you.

Important 2005 Update >>> Several people report the newest blank CDRs rated at 40x speed may not work in the 765. The "OPC error" is seen even when using the "audio" or "music" version of the CDR. This problem is confirmed by one user of the Memorex 40x Music CDR - the left side tray of this CDR was not recognized by the 765.

Important Note, the feedback that higher speed blank CDRs (over 40x) do not work with the 765 is only a theory.  The real problem may be that the 765 has been damaged during transport (most likely the laser becomes out of alignment). The 765 is subject to laser problems after transport with improper packaging.  If your 765 does not work with the blank CDRs (and the fix suggested above does not work), call a local electronics service store and ask if they are experienced repairing lasers in philips CD players / recorders. 

You need the a CD-R that says "consumer audio" or "digital audio" or "Music" CD-Rs. The less expensive recordable CDRs used in computers do not work (also called "data" CDR). The Audio  or Music CD-Rs are now available for about 25 to 50 cents per copy.

Generic, audio CDRs are now available at low cost if you buy a 100 spindle (without jewel plastic case). Kodak and Maxell sell audio CD-Rs in packs (10 or 30) for under $1.00 per unit. I recently tested one low-cost brand  - the Imation 80 minute "digital audio" (music) CDR and the results are excellent (purchased at Meijer's with no jewel case for 40 cents per CDR in a 25 pack spindle). These recordable CD-Rs can be recorded on one time only (also called "write once"). If you make a mistake in the recording, you live with it. But this type of recordable CD will play in almost any CD player. Vendors that sell the Audio Recordable CDs at reasonable prices are listed above under Related Links.

What CDR brand do you recommend?  I have had good luck with the Kodak, Maxell and TDK. I have heard stories that the some of the generic brands do not play well in some CD players such as in your car. The TDK is probably the best brand and now sells at very reasonable prices at vendors such as Cassette House.

You can also use a Re-Recordable Audio CD (also Re-Writable CD or CD-RW). You can record your music to a CD-RW and then erase the entire CD or erase the last track recorded (you cannot reorder the tracks unless you do a full erase and re-record). These are more expensive ($2 to $5 per copy) and they will not play in most portable CD players. So you can buy one audio CD-RW and use this to practice making recordings from different sources and test sound levels. Note, you need the special "audio" CD-RWs that work on the Philips recordable players, not the computer-type CD-RW's. The  Related Links site lists vendors that sell CD-RWs for between $2 and $5. If you have found the re-writable CDs at a lower cost, please let me know.

Why are audio CD-Rs and CD-RWs more expensive than the computer versions? The price of the audio version includes a levy that is paid to the music industry to be used to enforce their copyright laws. Part of a deal between the manufacturers of the recording CD players and the music industry.

2b. Can I make a custom cover to the plastic CD case and add a list of tracks on the back?

Yes, this is part of the fun. The blank CDs come with the plastic cases. You simply create a cover with your computer using your word processor, print it out and cut to size to fit the size of the paper placeholder that slides under the clear plastic front. The back cover is also replaceable by opening the CD case and pulling the inside back plastic cover out. If you want a more professional look, you can use the CD Labeling kits sold by the same vendors referenced above as a source for the blank CDs. 

2c. Can I write with a pen on the top of a CDR or stick a label on the top?

Felt tip pens that do not smear (permanent or oil based) are generally OK to use to write words on the top of CDR media. I have been using the Sanford Sharpie (black, fine point) felt-tip pen and it works great (cost about $1.50 and sold many places). Only use labels that are designed for CDs. For low-cost labels search for "cd labels" on J&R  Music.  Professional quality labelling kits are offered by ProSource and Neato

3b. What are the basic steps to recording with the 765?

To copy an entire CD place the source CD in the right tray and a blank audio CDR in the left tray. Now press DUBB repeatedly until the DUBB flashes on the display. The right side CD player will scan the tracks of the source CD and then stop. You may press the DISPLAY button to see the tracks you will record. Now press PLAY on the right side CD player to begin recording. Dubbing will stop automatically when done. To complete the process you must Finalize the CDR in the left side tray. Click on the FINALIZE button and within three seconds click on RECORD. Now wait for the two minute countdown to complete and the CDR is now done and ready to play in any CD player.

To record single tracks one at a time from multiple source CD's (compilation CD of your best tracks), put your first CD in the right side tray and blank CDR in left tray. Now click on the DUBB button until DUBB-1 flashes on the screen and in a few seconds the word record will begin flashing. Now use the |<< and  |>> buttons on the right side CD player to select the track number you want. To start recording now click on the PLAY button of the right side CD player. Repeat to add more tracks and finalize per above when done.

You can use the 765  remote control to create a program that allows you to record multiple tracks in the order you select from a single source CD. For example, you can create a program that tells the the 765 to record tracks 3, 12 and 1 from one CD and then tracks 2, 3 10, 11, and 5 from a second CD. You do this by first entering the program with the remote and then hit DUBB-1 and follow the steps above.

To record from external analog sources like a cassette player or turntable connected to your receiver with tape output of your receiver connected to the analog input of the 765.....first click on the SOURCE button of the 765 until ANALOG appears on the screen, now begin playing your source analog player (turntable or cassette) and hit the RECORD button of the left side CD player of the 765. At this point you are in standby recording mode and you should see the volume meter displayed on the center screen of the 765. The blue bars should be going up and down with the volume of your source music. Press the REC LEVEL buttons to adjust the volume up or down. Now hit the PLAY button of the left side CD player to begin recording. If you are in Manual recording mode, you can hit the >>| button of the left side player to add a track increment without stopping the recording. In the auto mode a track will be added when a couple seconds of silence it detected by the 765. When done hit STOP and finalize per above when you have completed all recording to your CDR.

3b. Can I transfer songs I recorded on a VCR to a CD?

Yes. The sound quality of transfers from a stereo VCR recorded on video tape at the SP mode is excellent. You need to connect your VCR to a receiver that is connected to the analog input of the CDR recorder or direct from the VCR to the recorder.

3c. Can I transfer songs from old albums and cassettes to CD?

Yes, just connect your turntable or cassette deck to your receiver and the receiver audio output to the analog input of the CD-R recorder. The songs will sound on CD exactly like they do when played on your turntable, including any hiss or crackles.

3d. How many of my favorite songs can I transfer to one blank CD?

The recordable CDs allow a 74 minutes and 30 seconds of recorded music. From my experience, you can expect to record 17 to 20 typical music tracks to a single CD.  The 80 minute digital audio CDRs also work in the 765.

3e. Do you need to finalize a CD-R after each recording session?

No. You can record any track or tracks to a CD-R, turn off the 765 (or take the CD-R out of the machine) and go back two weeks later and add more tracks.  A CD-R is "write once" so once you add a track, you cannot delete it or change the order of the tracks you have added, but you can add more tracks at any future session until you use up to 74 minutes and 30 seconds of recording time and then you hit "finalize" and now you are done. The finalized CD-R will now play in any CD player. The unfinalized CD-R will play in the left side CD tray of the 765 so you can listen to the unfinalized CD-R and remember what you did at prior recording sessions.

3f. Does the 765 record everything at 2 times (2x) speed?

My testing shows it only records at 2x speed when you dub multiple digital tracks. So if you dub an entire CD of digital tracks to a CD-R, this is at 2 times speed. If you dub a single track to a CD-R it records at 1x speed. Also, all recording in analog format seems to be in 1x speed.

3g. Will the 765 make copies of data CDs?

No. It will not read data CDs and will not copy them. It cannot be used to copy software or any video games.

3h. Can I adjust the recording levels so analog sources are recorded at the same volume as my digital CD tracks?

The 765 lets you adjust the recording levels by + or - 3db or 6db for analog recordings. From my experience, the +6db setting gives a volume level for music on VCR or albums that is about the same as my digital tracks on CD. You must set the recording volume before recording. The 765 volume meter lets you see the loudness of your source music before you begin recording and adjust the recording level the + or - 3 or 6db so the meter hits a target height that corresponds with your digital recording. You cannot fade the volume down while recording. Note, the 765 does not let you change the volume level for recordings of digital source material. So if you are making a compilation of your favorite digital CD tracks and some are recorded louder than others, this difference in volume will be heard in your CDR. One 765 user on usenet said the workaround on adjusting volume levels from your digital CD collection is to record to the 765 from an external CD player.

Tony from Australia adds these words of wisdom on this question:

Since the 765 lacks a proper variable level control (only has 4 preset levels, no fading possible), it is well worth going through an intermediate stage to give you some proper level control when copying from analog sources. This can be (if you are very lucky) a source with its own level
control on the line level outputs (e.g. some tape decks, tuners and a few hi-fi VCR's), or at the most basic level, a simple stereo pot across the outputs built into a switch box (call your electronically-aware buddy if not sure how to wire this up). I've done this, and it works just fine - I
use it all the time (you will probably have to set the 765 to the +6db setting on record, since a passive pot only allows you to cut the signal, not boost it. However if you set everything up so that normal levels are around the mid position of the pot, you can then effectively boost the final recording onto the 765 when needed, making use of the extra sensitivity setting selected on the 765).

Other options are to route the audio through a reasonable-to-good quality mixer or graphic, which will allow you to tweak the EQ and control levels at the same time. A final option is to go in and out of a reasonable-to-good quality cassette deck in "rec pause" or "rec standby" mode, and use the level control on the tape deck to control levels going to the 765.

3j. Can I manually add track number increments to my analog source music during recording?

Yes, for example, if you are recording from a source of cassette, albums or VCR tape, you can insert a new track number to a specific point in the recording by recording in analog, manual mode and hit the  >>|  forward button once on the left side CD recording deck at the point in the recording where you want a new track to be added. Changes to track numbers cannot be made after you have recorded to the CDR (if using a CD-RW you can  erase and start again).

3k. When I record an entire CD at 2x speed,  the 765 is adding a two second pause between each track that is not on my original source CD. This is a problem making copies of live recordings where I do not want these silent gaps between tracks. Can I make copies without these gaps?

Yes, the manual on page 14 says if you create a "Program" of all tracks in their original sequence and dub at normal speed (dubb-1), the pauses will not be added. The 765 will make a copy of the entire CD at 1x speed without the 2 second gaps between tracks.

4a. After I create my CD with my favorite songs, can I make copies of this CD? Are there workarounds to the SCMS protection?

You can make an analog copy of a digital copy, but not a digital copy of a digital copy. For example, I can make a CD-R of my favorite music from my music CD collection. Now I have an exact digital copy of the original tracks on my finalized CD-R. I can now put this CD-R in the right-side CD tray of the 765 and put a fresh, blank CD-R in the left-side CD tray. Now I click the "Dubb" button and hit play on the right side CD, and it records all the tracks on the right-side CD-R to the blank CD-R and makes an analog copy of the digital copy. The sound quality of this analog copy is very good (I can't hear a difference compared to the digital) and all the tracks are in order. Also the 765 makes these analog copies at one-time (1x) speed. Philips has intentionally designed the 765 with a  Serial Copy Management System (SCMS) to prevent the making of digital copies of digital copies. But you can make a copy. When the 765 sees the source music is a digital track on recordable media (CD-R or CD-RW), it proceeds with the recording, but in analog format at 1x speed.

Mike posted these definitive words on SCMS to usenet:

**EVERY** recording produced by a consumer digital recorder, regardless of
source, or generation, is "SCMS infested". The difference is only in which
bits of the SCMS subcode are set, which may be interpreted as "copy once",
"no copy" or "unlimited copy".

If you burn a disc with an analog source, that disc will have SCMS codes
indicating "copy once" and you can make one further digital generation
from it. (You can also, of course, burn many same-generation digital
copies of that master). You could not make digital copies of digital
copies made from that original master.

AFAIK the 765 "overcomes" an SCMS "no copy" disc by treating it as an
analog source; i.e. it plays the original through the D/A converter and
then re-converts back to digital on the record side. You then, of course,
introduce possible distortion, dynamic range reduction, sound level
issues, etc as with any analog-to-digital recording. (You can be sure the
low-end 765 does not have the best A/D and D/A converters out there).

The ability to make copies also applies to CD-RWs (the recordable CDs that you can erase and re-record). So you can copy your favorite music to a CD-RW and put the "finalized" CD-RW in the right side CD tray and make analog copy to a CD-R in the left side CD tray. (note: a "finalized" CD-RW can be "unfinalized" and erased and re-recorded but you need to finalize it to get it to play in the right-side CD player of the 765)

Note: you can make unlimited digital copies of your original digital music CDs (ex., your Matchbox 20 CD) if you make them one at a time (at 2x recording speed) with your music CD (not a CD-R or CD-RW) in the right CD tray and your blank CD-R in the left tray. But you cannot make a digital copy from a digital copy. If you use these multiple copies of your music CD for other than personal use, you probably violate the copyright laws.

One workaround discussed on usenet is to record your music to a CD-RW with your 765 and put the CD-RW into a PC-based CD burner. Now you can make a digital copy of the CD-RW to an inexpensive PC-type CDR or put the CDR copy (now a first generation CD) back into the right-side CD player of the 765 to make a digital copy.

Terry provides these ideas on workarounds to SCMS when recording from analog sources::

1.  Load CD-R disk into CDR765 and record an LP record through the analog inputs of the 765.

2.  After recording the LP, take the CD-R (finalized) and load into external CD player with digital outputs connected to the digital inputs of the CDR765.

3.  I can now make an exact digital copy using the external CD player and the 765 as the recorder.  This copy will be an exact duplicate of the first since it was made through the digital inputs.  No analog conversion takes place. 

Now, lets suppose I try the same scenario where the first copy was made using the play and record trays on the 765.  If I then try to place that 1st generation copy into an external CD player and try to make a copy through the digital inputs of the 765, then "copyright" flashes on the 765's display and I can't make a copy at all unless I use the 765's player and recorder both, which means an analog conversion takes place.   

 So...it appears that the 765 does not put the SCMS code on each song of a CD "if" it was 1st recorded through the analog inputs.  

 The only reason the above is important to me is that I can record all of my albums onto CD and then go back and make a compilation onto another CD without having to go through the analog conversion the 765 would perform if I used the 765 as both the player and recorder.

BTW, a DVD player works well as an external CD player because it has coaxial digital outputs and can play CD's, CD-R's and CD-RW's.   At least some can.  Some Panasonic DVD players can't even play CD-R's.   In my case, I use a Pioneer DV 414, which plays both CD-R's and CD-RW's.   At $350, it gives me both a DVD player and an external CD transport.

4b I'm a musician, can I use the 765 to put my own music on CD and make multiple copies?

Yes. See answer above. For example, if you recorded several sessions of your band on an 8 track recorder, now you can connect the recorder to the analog input of the 765 and copy to a CD-RW you have put in the left-side CD tray. If you make a mistake in the recording, with a CD-RW, you can erase the last track recorded or the entire CD-RW and start again. You now have completed up to 74 minutes of recording on the CD-RW of multiple sessions of your original music. Now you must "finalize" the CD-RW so it will play in the right-side CD player of the 765. You put a fresh, blank CD-R in the left CD tray, hit "Dubb" and play, and make a copy of the CD-RW to the blank CD-R. This is an analog copy made in real time (1x recording speed) with the same number and order of tracks.  You can make multiple copies of your music on CD with this method, each one costing you approximately $3 for the blank CD-R (and your time to record each one).

You can, in theory, record live to a CD-RW or CD-R in the 765 using a microphone and/or amplifier setup that connects to the analog input of the 765. The 765 does not have a separate microphone input jack. Also, you can record to a digital recording device, connect this to the digital input of the 765 (optical input plugs provided) and make a digital copy of your source music (at 44.1 kHz only). But, I believe the SCMS protection of the 765 will not allow you to make  a digital copy of the digital copy even if the original source music is your own digitally recorded music. You can make unlimited analog copies to a CD-R (at 1x recording speed).

Tony from Australia adds the following to this question:

Answer is yes (1 generation), and no (2 generations)  as you correctly describe - in the 765. However many musicians I believe would want a second (or more) generation digital master, especially if it is for a CD production and they want to avoid unnecessary D/A then A/D conversion - which the experts say will definitely degrade the sound in several key respects (and I'm inclined to agree).

Here's how to address the issue of SCMS protection:

(1) Read your audio CDR or CD-RW made on the 765 into a PC with CD burner attached (getting fairly common these days), burn a fresh audio CD, and hey presto, you have a "generation 1" copy again, all in the digital domain.

(2) Borrow a pro CD recorder like the HHB or Marantz, which I believe allows you to do the same thing

4c. Can I record my music by connecting my stereo to the 765 but then edit the music on a Computer with a ReWritable CD drive?

This is a very clever idea. The 765 does not have the power of PC-based CD writers to edit your music (ex., delete imperfections in your original source music or alter sections of individual tracks). You can use your stereo and 765 to record your music to an audio CD-RW  and walk over to your PC and put the CD-RW into a ReWritable CD drive (I'm told the Yamaha CD writer is the best).  Now you can  transfer the tracks you want to edit to your local drive using Adaptec's EZ CD Creator and edit the tracks as desired using a de-noise application like CoolEdit. Now transfer the finished tracks to a blank CDR in your PC ReWritable CD drive. 

4d. I  need more control of my recordings....change volume levels.....delete  portions of tracks...change track orders, etc. Can I use a Mini Disc recorder with the 765 to accomplish this?

Mark,

 I also have a need to preserve analog media on cd.  You should consider purchasing a Minidisc recorder for your system.  These discs are completely editable.  They even allow you to splice tracks and delete portions of tracks (very handy for lp) and set desired track order & recording level.  The cool thing is that if you use an optical cable you can dub digitally to your cdr. this preserves track sequence/numbering.  Once you've copied to cd you can then reuse your Minidisc. You could do all your lp transfers w/ one MD.  Also, in my opinion, my lps always sound better after transferring to MD.

I think it has to do w/ the ALTRAC method that MD employs.  Since your 765 only has a 1 bit a/d converter, you'll probably find the same to be true.

Hi Chris, Thanks for the info. I would like to add this to my site, if that is OK. Can I ask, what Minidisc recorder would you recommend?

  Mark,

 Hi Mark. Sorry I took so long to respond.  I've been quite busy.  I would recommend any MD player as long as it's not a portable.  They're not very practical for serious recording.  It's good to note, however, that you can often find deck recorders "bundled" with portables for a reduced price.  Buying portables solo is still quite expensive (unfortunately).  As far as price, I paid $299 for mine a year ago (basic Sony deck) and I'm very satisfied with the unit.  I really can't tell you more except that the better a/d converters may cost a little more.   It's cool if you want to put these suggestions on your site.  People will probably find MD editing very cool for LP duplication.  I don't feel that there's any better way as of yet!

                                                                                  Cheers,

                                                                                 Chris

p.s. People should be sure that the digital ins & outs between their MD & CDR decks match,  not all CDR decks, for example, have optical inputs.   

4e. Can I transfer MP3 songs to an audio CD using my computer and the 765?

You can record a mp3 to an audio CDR with the 765 by playing the mp3 on some type of mp3 player and send the audio output to the analog audio input of the 765 or it is possible to do it digitally if you have a digital output on your computer soundcard (ex., SB Live Digital). If you transfer mp3 files with your computer to a computer-type data CD, you cannot put this CD into the right-side tray of the 765 and transfer this to a blank audio CDR. The 765 does not read mp3 files on data CDs you create on your PC, only audio type CDs.  The newer Philips recorders, model 820, will read a CD with files in mp3 format, but not the 765.

5a. How do I contact Philips to get a Manual or Remote Control?  (last updated 2000)

The Manual for the 765 and 200 is now available from this site in pdf format by clicking here. To view a pdf file you need the Adobe Acrobat Viewer installed on your PC.  For a remote, call Philips at 800-531-0039 or try 888-744-5477. I hear they charge $60 for the remote. The only thing the 765 will not do without the remote is setup a program to play or record multiple tracks of your CD in a specified order, so you probably don't need one.  Official Philips Support Web Site.

About This Site:

This site launched December 27, 1998 by Mark Gallagher to share information and learn from others using the 765 or doing creative things with audio cdr recording technology. I have no commercial interest in any of the products discussed on this site. This information is believed to be true based on my experience or things I read on the web and usenet or receive from users of the 765 via e-mail. The opinions or facts presented here may be wrong. Follow all copyright laws when you use this technology.

Comments / Questions : mark@gallagher.com

Updates: this site is not updated on a regular basis, most of the FAQ data is updated as of 2000, there is newer information regarding finding blank CDRs that work in the 765 that is updated as of March 2007

Philips is not spelled Phillips.

 

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